The Treatment Room
Tips, tricks and advice for you as Sports Therapy Practitioners.

Welcome to The Treatment Room where we will add tips and advice that may be useful to you as practitioners within your chosen field. If you have any you would like to share, please send them to tim@sportstherapyuk.com and we may publish your top tip soon. To receive notification of future posts to our Treatment Room please Like our Facebook page by clicking here.

Recently published research suggests that we should modify well-established injury management protocols by introducing mechanical loading of the affected tissues much earlier than previously accepted.

These muscles play a vital role in ankle stability as well as balance so here is a brief overview of how to approach and treat the Fibularis or Peroneals.

The following article is founded on research conducted at the Division of Sports therapy & Rehabilitation at the University of Bedfordshire, Luton, LU1 3JU. The full Research article is available to view under Student Centre/Learning Resources on this website.

In demonstrating examination procedures of various joints throughout the body, inevitably on occasions positive signs are found upon applying specific tests. Recently, when testing for gleno-humeral laxity using the sulcus sign, we have observed two subjects who have displayed joints that sublux. In both instances there has been no previous history of trauma and there is no discomfort experienced on either subluxation, or reduction of the joint. They may each be classified as 3rd degree subluxations.

Cryotherapy has a potentially wide range of applications during manual therapy treatments. Here is a well known tip on advising clients how to apply ice at home, particularly on a confined and anatomically uneven area such as the ankle (round either malleoli). A gel ice pack will of course, conform with the shape; another method is to use a polystyrene cup filled with ice.

When presented with a haematoma, the most important assessment is to determine whether it is inter or intra-muscular, the latter having the greater potential for complications if not treated correctly. If the fascia surrounding the muscle is damaged (inter-muscular), this will allow the exudate to spread widely allowing the body to reabsorb and remove these fluids more easily. The superficial signs of discoloration are often more evident although the discomfort related to the swelling is usually less.

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